FAQ

Q:  How experienced do I have to be?
Dam Good Trips focuses on self-guided experiences and, as a result, we require our guests to have some previous paddling or hiking experience.  Each trip is tailored to your group’s experience, skill and comfort level.  We will find you that perfect trip.  Have a look at our hiking or kayaking Experience Self Evaluators to see where you fit and better understand what we mean by Levels 1, 2, 3, etc.  You can always add pre-trip instruction to improve your skills.

Q: What should I bring?

Kayaking:
Through our trusted suppliers, Dam Good Trips will provide your group with kayaks, paddles and kayak safety gear, we will also provide basic navigation and communication equipment.  You should bring your own camping gear (tents, sleeping bags/mats, stove, cooking equipment, bowls/cutlery as well as personal and paddling clothing).  If you need some camping equipment to be provided, let us know so we can build it into your trip plan.

If you are paddling on the north coast, you should have immersion gear (ie wetsuit/drysuit, or some kind of dry top).  If you are paddling in Desolation Sound or near Vancouver you won’t need immersion gear.  We will send you a suggested equipment and clothing list as part of your trip plan tailored for the area and conditions that you will be paddling in.

Hiking:
Dam Good Trips will provide your group with route instructions & directions, maps and, where necessary, basic navigation equipment. We can also take care of the food, just let us know and we will built menus and food into your trip plan. You will need to bring some good walking shoes (easier hikes) or those trusty hiking boots (more difficult hikes). If you are doing an overnight hike and not staying in one of our Bed & Breakfasts, you should also bring your own camping gear (tents, sleeping bags/mats, stove, cooking equipment, bowls/cutlery as well as personal hiking clothing). If you need some camping equipment to be provided, let us know so we can build it into your trip plan.

We will always send you a suggested equipment and clothing list as part of your trip plan tailored for the area and conditions that you will be in.

Q: What kind of wildlife will I see?
Kayaking:
The west coast of BC offers some of the best wildlife viewing in the world.  You will have the opportunity to see a wide range of birds, land and marine mammals, fish and intertidal invertebrates in their natural environment.

On the north coast you will most likely see humpback whales, as well as the occasional gray or minke whale and orcas (killer whales). Learn more about whales and ongoing research on the BC coast.  Also read about proper whale viewing etiquette.  You may also see pacific white-sided and dahl’s porpoises.  All five species of Pacific salmon (chinook, coho, sockeye, pink and chum) migrate off the west coast of BC to spawn in the rivers of British Columbia and Alaska.  You may also see sea lions and harbour seals.  If you are lucky you will get to see sea otters and you may find mink and river otters sneaking around your campsite. The coast is home to grizzly and black bears, and the Kemode (Spirit bear), a unique subspecies of the black bear, in which one in ten cubs display a recessive white coloured coat.  Other land mammals include wolves, cougars and coastal black-tailed deer.  Learn how to manage animal encounters.

You will encounter birds of all types: shorebirds, seabirds and marine waterfowl.  You may see golden eagles, bald eagles, herons, cranes, cormorants, murrelets and ducks and grebes of all shapes and sizes.  Find out more about BC coastal birds.

There is a rich intertidal environment, an endless carpet of layered life.  Everyday you will starfish, sunstars, anemones, sea cucumbers, clams of every description, mussels, snails, crabs, urchins and much more.  Learn more about what you will see.

Hiking:
The mountain wilderness of British Columbia is home to some fascinating critters. You will have the opportunity to see a wide range of birds land mammals in their natural environment.  Without a doubt you will see (and hear) the noisy douglas and red squirrels and their calmer cousins, grey squirrels and chipmunks. In higher alpine areas you may find marmots and pikas. The coastal mountains are also home to black bears.  In more urban settings you make come across coyotes, skunks and racoons. Other land mammals include rabbits and hares, porcupines, cougars and coastal black-tailed deer.

You will encounter birds of all types. You may see bald eagles and hawks, owls, the friendly whiskey jack, woodpeckers, grouse, Stellar’s jay, larks, swallows and chickadees of all shapes and sizes. There may also encounter herons, ducks and other waterfowl in the ponds and streams along the way. Learn more about the types of birds you might see on the trail.

We’d also really like for you to see a beaver while you are here because we think they are really cool. If you have a few spare moments, we suggest you to see them in Stanley Park at Beaver Lake. You can see them hard at work, forever damming and re-damming Beaver Creek.

Q: Is the wildlife dangerous?
Wildlife are wild and by their very nature are unpredictable.  This is what makes them exciting and interesting. And getting to see large mammals in their natural environment is a highlight of any trip.   Although animal encounters are plentiful on the west coast, they are very rarely dangerous.  It is important to respect their space, not to interfere with them and to keep your campsite clean as not to attract them in the first place.  Learn more about appropriate bear and cougar etiquette and how to manage animal encounters.

If we missed something or if you have additional inquires, please contact us.

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